10.28.2003

CALL FOR PAPERS (Deadline Extended: 12/29/03)

SARGASSO, a Journal of Caribbean Literature, Language, and Culture
Edited at the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras; Department of English
Deadline: December 29, 2003

SARGASSO is now accepting submissions and book reviews for an upcoming issue
to be entitled “Creolistics and Creole Exceptionalism: Linguistics and
Caribbean Languages.”

Research on the languages of the Greater Caribbean is a field of inquiry
that has always been and continues to be shaped by knowledge production in
other areas. One of the most provocative assertions made in recent years
concerning the study of Caribbean languages is the notion of Creole
Exceptionalism (cf. DeGraff). This concept exposes the ideological
environment from which the idea of a Creole emerges. It is a concept that
has potential implications for virtually every line of research within
Creolistics.

The SARGASSO editorial committee is seeking submissions which, either
explicitly or implicitly, engage the idea of Creole Exceptionalism. We
welcome work by anyone interested in linguistics: graduate students, junior
scholars, senior scholars and other researchers. One of the goals of this
issue is to encourage, bring together, and promote new and fresh
perspectives.

We invite contributions on a variety of topics; these include but are not
limited to:

Language Acquisition, Creole Genesis, Perceptual Dialectology, Substrate &
Superstrate Influences, Formalism vs. Functionalism, Pragmatics, Discourse
Analysis, TMA, Phonology, Syntax, Creole in Caribbean Literary Discourse,
Postcolonial Approaches to Language, Sociolinguistics, The History of
Creolistics,
Language Planning, Language Shift, Creole & Popular Culture, Language &
Power

Essay submissions should be 10-15 pages in length and double-spaced. With
essays, please include an abstract of 120 words or less. Reviews should be
approximately 1,000 words. Books for review need not focus specifically on
the Caribbean but should be published in 2001 or later and be pertinent to
the study of Creoles and / or other Caribbean languages. Submissions are
accepted in English, French, Papiamentu, or Spanish.

Essays and reviews should conform to APA guidelines or to the MLA style
guide. Electronic submissions as attachments in Word, WordPerfect or Rich
Text Format are appreciated. Papers sent through the postal system should
include a SASE and a copy in RTF format on diskette.

Electronic submissions, inquiries, and other questions should be mailed to:
uprcreolistics@yahoo.com. Please indicate ‘Sargasso Submission’ in the
subject line. Secondary email contact address: walicek@alumni.utexas.net

Send postal submissions to:
SARGASSO
PO Box 22831
University of Puerto Rico Station
San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931-2831
CALL FOR PAPERS


Philament, an online peer-reviewed journal of postgraduate scholarship in the fields of cultural studies and the literary arts, now invites contributors for its third edition, to be themed off-beat.

Submissions should be sent to philament@arts.usyd.edu.au and must be received by Friday 9 January 2004. Earlier submissions are encouraged.

Included below are dictionary and textual ideas for how off-beat might be incorporated into a creative or academic piece. These lists are by no means exhaustive.

off-beat n. (music) An unaccented beat in a measure; Out of rhythm
adj. Not conforming to an ordinary type or pattern; unconventional; queer; avant-garde; eccentric; Bohemian; strange; aberrant; deviant; heteromorphic; anomalistic; preternatural; off-centre; unnatural; unusual; weird.

Textual/topic suggestions:
- texts which are themselves ‘offbeat’ or which deal with ‘offbeat’ themes.
- the Avant-Garde; for example, Surrealism and Dada. Theatre of the Absurd.
- texts which are in any way marginalised; for example, texts in dialect or vernacular languages such as Edward Kamau Braithwaite’s The Arrivants.
- texts which protest against any aspect of mainstream culture, like Bob Dylan’s songs.
- satiric or parodic texts. texts that subvert genre, literary convention or canonical texts; for example, feminist retellings of European fairy-tales, Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, Derek Walcott’s Omeros or Margaret Atwood’s Good Bones.
- literary hoaxes, like the Helen Demidenko/Darville controversy or the Ern Malley affair.
- offbeat humour; for example in TV shows like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, CNNNN and Life Support.
- Beat poets.
- Jazz.
- alternative/indie culture, music, art, etc.
- fiction dealing with the paranormal or unexplainable.
- Queer Theory.

Also variations on offbeat.

beat: The area regularly covered by a reporter. A police circuit. A place where gay people go to meet sexual partners. So off beat could signify a departure from a standard or habitual location.

beat off:
To masturbate.
To repel, drive back or away.

Contributors are encouraged to submit self-contained pieces that meet any of the following criteria:

PART I: Creative
• Poetry
• Prose/narrative
• Short dramatic works

PART II: Critique
• Academic papers
- short articles up to 3,000 words
- long articles up to 8,000 words

PART III: Comment
• Reviews
• Conference reports

Please note:

Poetry submissions should be limited to 5 pieces of unspecified length.

Academic papers must conform to Chicago Manual of Style, Documentation Style I.

See site for details.

All submissions may be submitted electronically via email, CD or PC-formatted disk and must be in Microsoft Word or HTML format. Submissions must be accompanied by a brief biographical summary of the author, which should include information on the inspiration for or genesis of the submitted work.

Philament will only accept submissions that have not been previously published and are not under consideration elsewhere.

All copyright remains with contributors, but subsequent publication of works included in any Philament issue must acknowledge Philament as the site of initial publication.

For further information visit
http://www.arts.usyd.edu.au/departs/english/publications/philament
Locating Love

The English Student Association of the Graduate School and University
Center of CUNY announces its annual conference, to be held at the CUNY
Graduate Center, New York, NY on March 26, 2004. Graduate Students are
invited to submit proposals for 15-20 minute presentations. Proposals for
complete panels, comprised of three to four speakers, are also encouraged.

This year’s conference, entitled “Locating Love,” will explore some of the
near infinite ways we academics, working in a (post) post-structuralist
paradigm, confront, examine and understand Love’s many manifestations and
constructions. Possible paper or panel topics include:

Desire and subjecthood
Desire and gender identity
Sex/anatomical Love
Queer(ed) Love
Fetishism/the Love object
Sensation
Absence and Love
The political, institutional and sociological regulation of Love
The Love of State/the State of Love
Love and power
Landscapes and geographies of Love
Poetic and narratological constructions of Love
Epistolary Love
Influence and aftertexts
romance/Romance
Sentiment

Please send abstracts of approximately 300 words or panel proposals with a
separate cover sheet including your name, affiliation, address, phone
number, and e-mail address to:

Jessica DeCoux c/o
English Department
Graduate School and University Center
City University of New York
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016

Or send proposals via e-mail to Crystal Benedicks at crystalbenedicks@yahoo.com

Deadline for paper and panel proposals is January 10, 2004.
CALL FOR PAPERS

Acacia Group’s 2004 Conference

Theme: Culture, Context and Connections

The Acacia group seeks for papers for a Multiculturalism panel.
Papers for this panel may analyze multicultural texts/authors. Topics may
include: how is multiculturalism expressed in a work(s), how do
borders/countries effect perceptions/presentations of multiculturalism, do
multicultural texts promote cultural diversity, does an authors
identity/ethnicity make a work multicultural? Other topics that apply to
multiculturalism and our conference theme of “Culture, Context and
Connections” will be considered.

Conference date: Saturday March 13 2004
Submission Deadline: December 22nd 2003
Acacia Group of California State University Fullerton is seeking papers for
our 2004 conference. Please note submissions are open to Current California
State University Students and California State University Alumni.
The conference is open to Graduate and Undergraduate students. Graduate
Students maybe submit papers of 15-20 pages (20 minute presentation length).
Undergraduates may submit papers of 5-8 pages (10 minute presentation
length)

Papers maybe submitted electronically to: susanmariejohnson@hotmail.com
(word format please). Or mailed to: Acacia Group PO Box 5853, Fullerton CA
92838
The deadline is December 22, 2003
CALL FOR PAPERS

Acacia Group’s 2004 Conference

Theme: Culture, Context and Connections

The Acacia group seeks for papers for an Early American literature panel.
Papers for this panel may discuss any early American literature, dating from
John Smith to Mark Twain. In addition, paper can focus on a single work or
author as well compare works. Topic may address or draw connections that
illustrate cultural/social changes such as, gender roles, race, and class,
and the impact resulting from these changes. Other topics that apply to
early American literature and our conference theme of “Culture, Context and
Connections” will be considered.

Conference date: Saturday March 13 2004
Submission Deadline: December 22nd 2003
Acacia Group of California State University Fullerton is seeking papers for
our 2004 conference. Please note submissions are open to Current California
State University Students and California State University Alumni.
The conference is open to Graduate and Undergraduate students. Graduate
Students maybe submit papers of 15-20 pages (20 minute presentation length).
Undergraduates may submit papers of 5-8 pages (10 minute presentation
length)

Papers maybe submitted electronically to: susanmariejohnson@hotmail.com
(word format please). Or mailed to: Acacia Group PO Box 5853, Fullerton CA
92838
The deadline is December 22, 2003
CALL FOR PAPERS

"THE BODY"

Acacia Group’s 2004 Conference

Theme: Culture, Context and Connections

The Acacia group seeks for papers for a panel on “The Body.” Topics for this panel should analyze the body its various form, such as the body of a text, body of speech and the physical body. Making connections with a single or multiple work(s), examine how the body functions for or within a text. Papers may want to address such topics as: silences within bodies of speech acts; the body as a marker of identity; the body and power. Other topics that apply to “the body” and our conference theme of “Culture, Context and Connections” will be considered.

Conference date: Saturday March 13 2004
Submission Deadline: December 22nd 2003

Acacia Group of California State University Fullerton is seeking papers for our 2004 conference. Please note submissions are open to Current California State University Students and California State University Alumni.

The conference is open to Graduate and Undergraduate students. Graduate Students maybe submit papers of 15-20 pages (20 minute presentation length). Undergraduates may submit papers of 5-8 pages (10 minute presentation length)

Papers maybe submitted electronically to: susanmariejohnson@hotmail.com (word format please). Or mailed to: Acacia Group PO Box 5853, Fullerton CA 92838


The deadline is December 22, 2003
CALL FOR PAPERS


The Acacia Group is looking for papers for a POP CULTURE panel. Topics may include Romantic influences in Pop Culture, intertextuality and influence of pop culture on literature, science fiction/fantasy, television and music, the evolution of sex and sexuality. Other topics that apply to pop culture and our conference theme of “Culture, Context and Connections” will be considered.

Conference date: Saturday March 13 2004
Submission Deadline: December 22nd 2003

Acacia Group of California State University Fullerton is seeking papers for our 2004 conference. Please note submissions are open to Current California State University Students and California State University Alumni.

The conference is open to Graduate and Undergraduate students. Graduate Students maybe submit papers of 15-20 pages (20 minute presentation length). Undergraduates may submit papers of 5-8 pages (10 minute presentation length)

Papers maybe submitted electronically to: susanmariejohnson@hotmail.com (word format please). Or mailed to: Acacia Group PO Box 5853, Fullerton CA 92838
The deadline is December 22, 2003
CALL FOR PAPERS

Acacia Group’s 2004 Conference
Theme: Culture, Context and Connections

The Acacia Group is looking for papers for a British Early Modern Period Panel. Topics may include: prose and Poetry of the period, female authors of the period, recent additions to the canon (“re-discovered” authors) – overlooked authors, authors added to expand ethnic/gender/or other view points and/or manuscript research versus modernized texts. Other topics that apply to early modern studies and our conference theme of “Culture, Context and Connections” will be considered.

Conference date: Saturday March 13 2004
Submission Deadline: December 22nd 2003

Acacia Group of California State University Fullerton is seeking papers for our 2004 conference. Please note submissions are open to Current California State University Students and California State University Alumni.

The conference is open to Graduate and Undergraduate students. Graduate Students maybe submit papers of 15-20 pages (20 minute presentation length). Undergraduates may submit papers of 5-8 pages (10 minute presentation length)

Papers maybe submitted electronically to: susanmariejohnson@hotmail.com (word format please).
Or mailed to: Acacia Group PO Box 5853, Fullerton CA 92838

The deadline is December 22, 2003

10.18.2003

CALL FOR PAPERS


(Con)textual Identities: Formation and Reformation
April 2-4, 2004
Tenth Annual Southwest Graduate Scholars Symposium
Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona

The conference welcomes one-page abstracts, session and roundtable proposals from graduate scholars in any area of discursive constructions of identity/ies. Twenty minute presentations might focus on a specific work regarding the representation of identity/ies in the fields of literature, art, history, popular culture, composition and rhetoric, gender studies, philosophy, science and technology, music and theology. Because the theme of the conference is inclusive and interdisciplinary, it provides focus for a dialogue while encouraging creative connections across several areas of graduate scholarship. Submissions are invited on the following topics that are meant to motivate, but not limit, your thinking:
Selfhood and Agency * Rhetorical Constructions of Selfhood * (En)gendering Identities * Virtual Identities * Contextualized Pedagogies: Identity in the Classroom * Selfhood and/in/through Composition * Identities in and through Popular Culture * Subversions or (Re)formations of Racial/Historical/Religious Identities * Intertextual Constructions of Identity/ies * Comparative Literatures * Constructivist vs. Essentialist * Authorial Intention vs. Social Context * Voice * Authority * Persona * Authenticity * Politics/Activism * Cultural Myths/Ideals * Social Roles * Othering

Along with your abstract attachment, please include home and office phone numbers, complete mailing address, e-mail address, AV requirements, and professional affiliation. Email submissions are encouraged.
Email: swgls@asu.edu
Maximum length of abstract: 500 words
Deadline for abstracts: December 1

Please direct questions, abstracts, and proposals to:
Nowell Marshall
Southwest Graduate Symposium
Arizona State University
Tempe, Arizona
85287-0302
swgls@asu.edu

10.16.2003

CALL FOR PAPERS

Topic: (Dis)Integration

Portals: A Journal in Comparative Literature is a graduate student run journal coordinated by the Comparative Literature Student Association at San Francisco State University.

We invite original, critical essay submissions that take a comparative approach to the topic: (Dis)Integration
This topic could include (but is not limited to) the following approaches:
- Deconstructionist readings
- Literature dealing with the Disintegration of:
o Nation-States
o The Family
o The Individual
o The Community
o Revolution
o The tearing or falling apart of most any entity
- Literature and Interpretations dealing with Integration:
o Bildungs (Developmental) Novels
o Nation Formation
o Character Formation
o The formation of most any entity
We encourage submissions to interpret our topic in the broadest sense.

All drafts should be in English and all citations in foreign languages must be clearly translated and cited. Papers should be no longer than 20 pages in 12 point font, and should include a works cited page and parenthetical references according to current MLA style.

Papers must be submitted via e-mail as an MSWord attachment. Your paper should include a cover sheet with paper title, name and e-mail address. Along with the paper please include a 250-word abstract, and a short bio including name, address, telephone and e-mail address and school affiliation.

We are also accepting submissions short poetry translations. Translations of poetry should be no longer than 2 MLA pages and should include a brief (2-5 page) explication of the poem, including its relation to the theme. Poetry will be published in tandem with the original. Please submit the original with complete citation. Creative/artistic visual interpretations of our theme are also being accepted for consideration as cover art/supplementation to the papers.

Contributions accepted for this project will be reviewed by at least two reviewers with the understanding that the materials have not been submitted to another journal.

Due Date: December 31. 2003

Please direct all submissions and inquiries to: clsasfsu@yahoo.com

10.14.2003

SFSU SCHOLARSHIP

The College of Humanities is now accepting applications for the Judith Anne Ott Scholarship. An applicant must be currently enrolled as a classified graduate student in a degree program housed in the College of Humanities. Applicants must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in their undergraduate and graduate work. An application must include:

1. A cover letter from the applicant describing why he or she is seeking a Masters Degree in one of the disciplines housed in the College of Humanities and how the scholarship will benefit her or his studies. The cover letter should also include contact information (i.e., mailing address, telephone number[s], and email address).

2. At least one recommendation letter (two preferred) from a faculty member familiar with the student's work.

3. An unofficial transcript from the institution granting the BA degree and an unofficial transcript of any completed graduate work.

The scholarship award will be for $500 for the Spring 2004 semester. Submit application materials in HUM 484 by November 1, 2003.

10.11.2003

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

LISA E-Journal is inviting contributions to an issue on "Biography versus Fiction: the Value of Testimony" to be published in June 2004. All contributions (in French or English) should be submitted by March 15, 2004. Illustrations
can be provided on the express condition that no copyrights are to be paid. Proposed contributions to this project will be examined by at least two reviewers and may be accepted only on the understanding that the materials have not been submitted to and accepted by another journal. All submissions should be double-spaced, and conform to the MLA style. For other details, please check on LISA e-journal's web-site.

Contact: Anne Garrait-Bourrier (anne.garrait@wanadoo.fr)

This theme of reflection focuses on the value and authenticity of historical testimony when it is conveyed by any kind of subjective literary form, whether it be the autobiographical genre stemming from personal experience or the subjective interpretation of this testimony through fictional literary works. The field of study discussed is that of American XIXth and XXth century cultural studies, directly linked with minorities and written testimonies coming from ethnic groups. In this domain, more than in any other, memory and individual testimony are the only warrants for the permanency of historical knowledge as well as the protection and perpetuation of a cultural identity.

I. We will first concentrate on the XIXth century. It will be interesting to observe how these minorities express, in a direct or indirect way, their intimate historical traumas, and how their voice can be conveyed - or even betrayed, and we shall see why and how - often by the fictional voice of a third person, detached from the group. Using a comparative analysis, we may wonder - though it is just one example among others - in what way the slave narratives, when used as a basis
for the writing of abolitionist texts, actually offer an illustration of this interplay between authentic testimony and "reported" testimony. We may also consider the biographical or autobiographical texts produced by some Indian Chiefs testifying to the realities of their political and economic situation at the end of the XIXth century, but also about the interpretation given by some biographers who rewrote those oral testimonies to turn them into books destined to be sold as autobiographies . Is this "reported" voice, once transcribed, the same testimony, and does it have the same "value" as direct expression?

II. The theme of "minority" groups expressing themselves - and the words "minority" and "minor" should be defined in the context of the United States and put into perspective - whether it be in a direct or indirect way, is still valid in the XXth century. The writers descending from minority groups have inherited the memory/ies of their ancestors: fiction thus becomes the ideal medium for many Black or Indian writers (we may also consider other minorities) willing to pass on this preserved Memory. Once again, the intimate relationship between "direct" and "indirect" testimony - inside the same community this time - is at work. Its aim, however, is different : it might be the survival of an ancestral and timeless cultural patrimony (the memory of Africa, of slavery, of the original tribal life, of the Great Plains, the transmission of the oral tradition and so on). We will then try to unveil the mechanisms used to ensure this transition between past and future and the literary modes which seem to be effective in the preservation of this cultural identity.
CALL FOR PAPERS

The Science Fiction Foundation seeks entries for its annual graduate
essay prize.
£250 will be awarded for the best unpublished essay in science fiction
criticism.
The winning entry will be published in the journal 'Foundation'.

The judges of the competition are:
Andrew M. Butler (Canterbury Christ Church University College): editor
of 'Vector'
Elizabeth Hand: author and reviewer for 'The Magazine of F&SF'
Gary K. Wolfe (Roosevelt University, Chicago): reviewer for 'Locus'

The deadline for submissions is 31st May 2004.

Entrants must be registered for a higher degree.
The judges reserve the right to withhold the award.

Two electronic copies should be submitted, one anonymous, of 5000-8000
words.

Submissions should be sent as a Word document to:
Dr Farah Mendlesohn
Editor of 'Foundation'
farah@fjm3.demon.co.uk

All submissions will be considered for publication in 'Foundation'.
CALL FOR PAPERS!

The Creative Writing area of the Popular Culture Association is seeking
presentations of fiction and plays/screenplays. The topics last year
ranged from the Elvis Generation, idolizing Dolly Parton, life on a US
military base at the height of the Cold War, and the tragicomic experience
of a job seeker at an MLA conference. Readings should take 15-20 minutes
and should be self-contained, even if excerpted from a larger work.

Please send a description or a sample of the piece you propose to read
accompanied by each presenter’s name, position/title, school/work address,
phone number, email address, and a brief (25-50 word) biography of the
presenter for publicity purposes, to the area chair by NOVEMBER 15, 2003.

The National PCA/ACA Conference of 2004 takes place from April 7 - 10 at
the San Antonio Marriott Rivercenter, 101 Bowie Street, San Antonio,
Texas. This year is a joint conference with the SW/Texas Regional
PCA/ACA. You will find more information on the National organizations at
http://www.h-net.org/~pcaaca.

Email submissions and any questions may be sent to: constance19@hotmail.com

Send regular mail submissions to:

Constance Squires

English Department

205 Morrill Hall

Oklahoma State University

Stillwater, OK 74078



Leslie Fife, Ph.D.
Program Coord., Nat'l PCA/ACA
English Dept., 205 Morrill Hall
Oklahoma State University
Stillwater, OK 74078
405.624.8428; fax 405.744.6326
CALL FOR PAPERS

THE MIDWESTERN CONFERENCE ON LITERATURE, LANGUAGE & MEDIA (MCLLM)
APRIL 2 & 3, 2004
NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY
DEKALB, ILLINOIS

KEYNOTE Speakers:

Dr. Tom Shippey, St. Louis University
"Adapting Middle-earth: Tolkien, the Books and the Movies"
Dr. Thom Swiss, University of Iowa
"Literature and 21st Century Media"
&
Dr. Haj Ross, University of North Texas
"The Shape of Meaning"

We welcome one page abstracts for 10-page papers (each presentation
lasting approximately 15-20 minutes)on any topic pertaining to media,
language and literary studies. The following are detailed calls for
papers for the conference in general or special sessions:

Medievalism
British & American Literature
Cognitive Studies
Communication Theory
Film Studies
Cyberstudies and New Media
Ethnic and Cultural Studies
Applied Linguistics
Sexual Deviance and Film
Poetry
Disabilities in Literature and Film
Shakespeare and Performance
Teaching Literature On-line

GUIDELINES FOR ABSTRACTS:

1-page abstract with title but no author, and a cover letter that
includes:

1. paper title

2. your name and address

3. your phone number

4. e-mail address

5. school affiliation

Please also indicate if we have your permission to post your abstract on
the Website for the conference.

In addition, MCLLM 2004 encourages abstracts submitted as potential
panels. If you and your colleagues share an interest in a topic, please
submit it as a panel. Please note that these submissions will be
treated as a single unit. All abstracts must be submitted together and
be clearly marked for panel consideration.

ABSTRACT DEADLINE: Postmarked or emailed by February 2, 2004.

Mail/email abstracts to:

MCLLM Directors
c/o Department of English
Northern Illinois University
DeKalb, IL 60115

E-mail: MidwesternCLLM@yahoo.com

We look forward to hearing from you!

Andrew M. Sidle
Department of English
Northern Illinois University
DeKalb, Illinois 60115
815-753-6615 (w)
815-748-1017 (h)
asidle@niu.edu
"Globalization is/in America"
Northwestern University
Evanston, IL
Thursday, April 29, 2004


This interdisciplinary graduate student conference examines the terms
"globalization" and "America" as they have been problematized in recent
cultural and literary criticism. We are interested in papers that pay
particular attention to the internationalization of what heretofore has
been known as "American Studies." Broadly speaking, papers for
"Globalization is/in America" should consider how the idea of the nation
and the nation-state structures cultural imaginaries, individual and group
identities, and disciplinary boundaries.

"Globalization is/in America" takes up the following questions: What is at
stake in a movement toward a post- or transnational approach to literary,
cultural, historical, and sociological study? How are nations constituted
or contested through the production of cultural objects? In turn, how does
the idea of nation further inform or inflect our ideas about racialized,
gendered, and classed subjectivities? How has work on America informed
ideas about "the nation," and in what ways is "America" always already
postnational? Finally, what is to be gained or lost by doing scholarly work
that moves across boundaries?

Northwestern University will also be hosting a conference, "Globalizing
American Studies," on April 30 and May 1, 2004. This important conference
will bring together a group of scholars from various disciplines, including
Kate Baldwin (English, University of Notre Dame), Moustafa Bayoumi
(English, Brooklyn College), Rachel Buff (History, Bowling Green State
University), Brent Hayes Edwards (English, Rutgers University), Brian
Edwards (English, Northwestern University), Brian Larkin (Anthropology,
Barnard College), and Kariann Yokota (History, Yale University), to discuss
their new work. As "Globalization is/in America" is being held in
conjunction with this event, registration entitles presenters admission to
both conferences.

Paper topics might include, but are not limited to:

Narratives and histories of "American Studies"
Definitions of national and nationalist literatures
Anthologies of literary and cultural production
National and international prizes for cultural production (e.g. Booker
Prize, Nobel, Commonwealth Prize, etc.)
Cultural periodization and national ideology
"Native" or "minor" literatures
National languages
Anderson's "Census, Map, Museum" revisited
Identification papers and ID cards
Internationalization of "national" cultures
De-centering and internationalization of studies about the US
Diaspora and diasporic identities
Alien, resident alien, non-resident alien


Proposals: Papers should be 15-20 minutes in length. We invite submissions
of both panels and individual papers. Panel proposals should outline the
panel as a whole and include 300 word abstracts of each individual paper.
Paper proposals should include a 300 word abstract that explains the
paper's purpose and how it relates broadly to the theme of the conference.
Proposals are due December 15, 2003 to Bishupal Limbu at
globalnu2004@yahoo.com.
CALL FOR PAPERS

The Deadline for paper submissions to the CSU Shakespeare Symposium has been extended from October 1 to October 12 for all paper and abstract submissions.

The conference website for those interested in attending with or without
presenting a paper is posted at www.csulb.edu/centers/med-ren/shaksymp/symphome.html

The deadline for registering is October 31.

The Keynote speaker on Friday November 14 is Jean Howard, Columbia
University.

Dr. Lloyd Edward Kermode
Associate Professor of English
Co-Director, Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Department of English
California State University, Long Beach
1250 Bellflower Blvd.
Long Beach, CA 90840
(562) 985-4212

10.02.2003

USE OF STANFORD LIBRARY

You can get into Stanford libraries with fairly minimal fuss. At the door of Greene library you fill out a short web form and get a printed day pass. You have to show a photo ID. You get 7 free visits per school year.

You can't check out any books.

The 7-visit limit is somewhat meaningless since you can re-register under a slightly different version of your name, and get in again on day 8.

Other options are:
Visits to Special Collections are unlimited.
if you join the Friends of the Library group for $35 a year you also get in free.

Public catalogs and printing options are limited without a Stanford ID, so look up books on the web before you go.

It's an excellent library and handy if you live on the Peninsula.
CALL FOR PAPERS

The Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association 2004 Conference, "Fame and Notoriety in the Middle Ages and Renaissance," welcomes papers in all areas of Medieval and Renaissance studies, and especially encourages papers that speak to the theme of fame and notoriety.

Abstracts/proposals of ca. 250 words should include the paper's title, presentation time (limited to 20 minutes, please) and a summary of the proposed paper. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is February 16, 2004. The Conference, hosted by Fort Lewis College, will be held at the Doubletree hotel in Durango, Colorado, May 13-16 2004.

Abstracts may be sent in hard copy, faxed, or e-mailed to:
Katherine Clark
Department of History
Fort Lewis College
1000 Rim Drive
Durango, Colorado 81301
clark_k@fortlewis.edu
Fax: (970) 247-7127
Phone: (970) 247-7324
CALL FOR PAPERS


Inhabiting the Body / Inhabiting the World:
An Early Modern Cultural Studies Conference
March 19-20, 2004
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Plenary speakers will include John Sutton (Macquarie University,
Sydney), Lorraine Daston (Director, Max Planck Institute for the
History of Science), Steven Mullaney (University of Michigan), and
Gail Kern Paster (Director, The Folger Shakespeare Library).
This conference will focus on selfhood, embodiment and environment in
the early modern world. Most broadly, the conference will consider
what notions of selfhood are provoked by approaching a range of
cultural texts from an "ecological" perspective - one in which the
microcosmic "body" is seen as continuous with and permeated by the
macrocosmic "environment." Papers from a range of disciplines,
regional specializations and theoretical positions are invited.
Topics might include: how the depiction of various "environments" is
linked to the depiction of subjectivity; how representations of
activity, repose, drinking, air, or emotion often emphasize (with and
without anxiety) the malleable subject's openness to external agents;
how the humoral emphasis on both bodily permeability and the fully
somatic nature of cognition affect the way in which we understand
mind-body relations; how the representation of early modern
subjectivity is linked not only to notions of "inwardness," but to
those of "outwardness" or liminality; and how both travel, within and
across national boundaries, and cross-cultural encounters posed
problems for conceptions of the subject predicated upon its
environmental and cultural situatedness.
Abstracts (maximum of 600 words) should be submitted by Nov. 15, 2003 to:
Mary Floyd-Wilson
and
Garrett Sullivan

--
Garrett A. Sullivan, Jr.
Associate Professor of English
103 Burrowes Bldg.
Penn State University
University Park, PA 16802
Office: 814-863-9585
Dept. Fax: 814-863-7285
CALL FOR PAPERS

Cross-Cultural Expressions of Spirituality (1/31/04; collection)

Recent events have led to reappraisals of religion and spirituality.
This creates an opportunity to collect in one volume the different and
differing perspectives and interpretations of what it means to be
religious or spiritual today. Essays intended for an international
audience are therefore solicited for inclusion in a collection
tentatively entitled "Uniqueness and Versatility: Cross-Cultural
Expressions of Spirituality". The book is to bring together innovative
but readable explorations of religious, mythological, cosmological and
theological texts.

The editor welcomes well-researched essays aimed at (re)reading
established and emergent voices in the mentioned areas. Contributors
are at liberty to explore any aspect of spirituality, culture and
religion reflecting their academic and scholarly orientations.
Contributions on the themes such as spiritual awakening, God, ecstasy,
super-fear, education, women's spirituality, non-Western traditions,
esotericism and the like are welcome.

Submissions should be between fifteen and twenty-five pages, although
longer contributions will be accepted in exceptional circumstances.
Contributors are encouraged but not necessarily bound to adopt the MLA
format in preparing their essays, and submissions can initially be made
either electronically or in two hard copies. Even though the deadline
for submissions is January 31,2004, the editor welcomes early
submissions and enquiries.

All contributions should be sent to:

Dr. 'BioDun J. Ogundayo
Humanities Division
University of Pittsburgh
Bradford Campus
300 Campus Drive
Bradford, PA 16701

Email:ogundayo@pitt.edu
UCB LIBRARY PRIVILEGES

Just a reminder that as a student, faculty, staff member of SFSU you can obtain Library privileges at UC Berkeley. The UC Berkeley library is a relatively near supplement to our own holdings in the JPLL.
You need not be a student to enter the main library at Berkeley, but if you would like access to the stacks you need to present a library card, which can be purchased at the privileges desk. SFSU students need only provide proof of present enrollment at SFSU. I have twice obtained a library card by showing them a printout of my current class schedule, which can be obtained on the MySFSU page (accessible through the SFSU home page).
With that information and a $25 fee, you are allowed access to the stacks as well as a 20 book check out limit (quite generous if you ask me.)
Further, should you be cross-registered at Berkeley you will be issued a special library card with unlimited privileges.

If you have any questions please e-mail the CLSA.